Hispanic Chamber of Commerce Montgomery County’s statement on the New Montgomery County Economic Development Corporation

 

 

Hispanic Chamber of Commerce Montgomery County’s statement on the New Montgomery County Economic Development Corporation

 

 The Hispanic Chamber of Commerce of Montgomery County (HCCMC) congratulates the new board members to the newly established Montgomery County Economic Development Corporation. The HCCMC looks forward to working closely with the new organization to ensure the needs and priorities of Hispanic businesses, particularly the growing number of Hispanic owned small businesses, are met.  We will be carefully reviewing this inclusion as the board makes decisions in selecting leadership and key personnel.  The lack of representation at the Board level of Hispanic owned small business is concerning to us, because it is a very important factor in the economic development in this County in particular, and in the ability to inspire and motivate youth as they seek careers and futures in a very diverse community.  Hispanic representation in the new body is extremely important.  Equally important, the HCCMC urges a strong focus on supporting the growing number of Hispanic-owned small businesses which are fundamental to our growth as a county and as a community.The Montgomery County Economic Development Corporation board is comprised mainly of large business representatives from key economic sectors, surely intended to bring the influence necessary to attract and retain investment in the region.  Even though Hispanic small business representation is blatantly absent, it is our hope that the Board will be mindful of ensuring new opportunities for Hispanic-owned suppliers and the contracts let to larger businesses will require such participation. 

The HCCMC is concerned that the large business focus evidenced by the representation on the Board may result in under-valuing the relevance of the growing number of small businesses in the county.  We hope the newly established Montgomery County Economic Development Corporation will build on the great strides made by the County for small business inclusion in procurement and in policies, and that the Board will be mindful of the relevance and importance of programs and policies that provide fair access to opportunities and not unduly burden small businesses, particularly minority owned small businesses, with administrative paperwork and costly processes that discourage fair competition.  Many of our constituent businesses are experiencing rapid growth and contribute greatly to innovation and prosperity in the community. We look forward to working with you to achieve goals of mutual interest.

 

The Hispanic Chamber of Commerce of Montgomery County (HCCMC) is the Gateway to Hispanic Business in Montgomery County, Maryland. Established in 1998, and with a growing membership and sponsor network, the HCCM is an IRS 501c (6) nonprofit business organization. Multiple programs support the growing community of Hispanic business and those who serve the Hispanic market in the county.

2015 AFI Latin American Film Festival

AFI Latin American Film FestivalLocation: AFI Silver Theatre and Cultural Center

Festival Dates: September 17 – October 7

Festival Webpage: AFI.com/Silver/LAFF

Official Hashtag: #AFILatinFilm

AFI’s Silver’s Twitter Handle for Mentions: @AFISilver

AFI Facebook Page for tagging FB Posts: Facebook.com/AFISilverTheatre

Instagram page: @afisilvertheatre

Pase Especial — All-access Pass Information (provides admission for one to every film in the festival):

$150/$135 AFI Members

Semana de los pequeños negocios “walk and meet” en Langley Park, MD. La semana del 4 al 8 de mayo se conoce como la semana de los pequeños negocios en Estados Unidos.

 

Julie Rios Little-especial para El Tiempo Latino | 5/5/2015

 

La semana del 4 al 8 de mayo se conoce como la semana de los pequeños negocios en Estados Unidos y en el Condado de Montgomery vale la pena reconocer el esfuerzo de organizaciones como la Cámara Hispana del Condado de Montgomery y la Asociación de Pequeños Negociantes de Langley Park, quienes se han unido para ayudar a numerosos empresarios del área a desarrollarse adecuadamente. Con las famosas caminatas ‘walk and meet’, ambas organizaciones recorren la zona de Langley Park y conversan con los emprendedores acerca de sus retos y como mejor asistirlos. –

“Con estas caminatas visitamos a los negocios, les hacemos una entrevista para comprender mejor sus necesidades y poder apoyarlos y defenderlos mejor” comenta Mayra Bayonet de la Cámara Hispana durante su visita al camión de comida Antojitos Salvadoreños. Jorge Sactic, dueño de la panadería Chapina Bakery y Presidente de la Asociación de Pequeños Negociantes de Langley Park nos explico que existe mucho desconocimiento de los procesos y derechos por parte de los comerciantes inmigrantes. Un problema grave que enfrentan es el elevado costo de los alquileres. “Nos dimos cuenta que muchos carecían de conocimiento y encontraban varios obstáculos y sufrían de abusos. Dueños de edificios, por ejemplo, han hecho firmar a los negociantes contratos de renta que sobre favorecen a los propietarios y muchas veces dejan a los emprendedores en la ruina” dijo Sactic. La asociación que Sactic preside provee apoyo a los negociantes de todo el corredor internacional que se encuentra entre dos condados Montgomery y Prince George’s. “Estamos entre dos jurisdicciones y eso complica las cosas y se está presionando para que los concejales que representan ambas áreas trabajen en conjunto. Nosotros como comunidad hemos aportado bastante. Tenemos casi 3 décadas aquí, hemos creado una actividad económica muy grande y en ese intercambio tienen que ponernos atención” afirmó. Un punto en el que ambos condados deberán trabajar en equipo es la construcción de la línea morada. El Presidente del Concejo de Montgomery, George Leventhal, apoya el desarrollo de la línea morada pero está consciente que podría ser difícil para los pequeños negocios. “Pienso que el gobierno tiene la obligación de ayudar a los comerciantes con un poco de asistencia financiera o de otras maneras, como asistencia técnica durante la transición” aseveró Leventhal. La Cámara Hispana del Condado de Montgomery y la Asociación de Pequeños Negociantes de Langley Park brindan oportunidades para que los comerciantes hispanos se informen, organicen, y articulen sus prioridades ante los gobiernos locales. – See more at: http://eltiempolatino.com/news/2015/may/05/hablemos-del-walk-and-meet/#sthash.6YOdqobI.dpuf

 

Business Success Training Center (BSTC). Wheaton, MD

The Hispanic Chamber of Commerce of Montgomery County (HCCMC), as business-oriented organization, works closely with the HBFMD to promote the growth of local minority businesses through collaborative individual counseling, webinars and topic-specific seminars.

Currently, HCCMC are focusing in re-launching the “Business Success Training Center” (BSTC), formerly known as the Mario Loiederman Training Center, with the purpose of strengthen the business community in Montgomery County. The mission of the BSTC is aligned with the County Executive priority: “Better nurture the entrepreneurial culture by introducing programs such as MC Square and Montgomery Moving Forward Workforce Coalition in Montgomery County”.

The Chamber aims to direct particular attention to the needs of the minority small business community that struggles with gaining a proper foothold to provide significant gainful employment to County residents. Small businesses with 5 to 30 employees typically under $3 Million in revenue and in operation over 2 years are unstable. The proper infrastructural support, and access to capital can help businesses to stabilize and become self-sustainable. Much of the growth within the small business community depends on branding support, legal assistance, and a robust management team.

Small business owners at this stage have achieved some level of success at having a business presence and transact enough business to gain revenues of over $200,000. Businesses are the engine for job creation in the County. The challenge is to direct business entities to funding opportunities and the right markets. The Chamber has as part of its mission to provide strategic assistance to Hispanic and other minority owned small businesses for enhancing sustainability and market growth. .

The program is aimed at those small businesses that have not reached a point of stability and for whom the cash flow and technical expertise is insufficient to develop the needed internal structures that would be inductive to become financially viable and a dependable employer.

The program focus on, Business management education, Facilitation of strategic partnerships, Affordable legal counseling and services, Financial literacy and access to capital, Business development and marketing support.

 

 

Uncovering the Benefits of Minority and Women-Owned Certifications

Certification Overview
Certification is a review process designed to ensure that a small business is actually owned, controlled, and operated by the applicants. Most certifications are granted for Minority or Women owned businesses, Small Disadvantaged Businesses, and Underutilized businesses. Certification agencies implement the processes for government and private sector entities and ensure that only firms that meet the eligibility criteria of the individual programs are properly certified.

SBA’s Definition of a Small Business

The SBA defines a small business concern as one that is independently owned and operated, is organized for profit, and is not dominant in its field. Depending on the industry, size standard eligibility is based on the average number of employees for the preceding twelve months or on sales volume averaged over a three-year period. Examples of SBA general size standards include the following: •Manufacturing: Maximum number of employees may range from 500 to 1500, depending on the type of product manufactured;
•Wholesaling: Maximum number of employees may range from 100 to 500 depending on the particular product being provided;
•Services: Annual receipts may not exceed $2.5 to $21.5 million, depending on the particular service being provided;
•Retailing: Annual receipts may not exceed $5.0 to $21.0 million, depending on the particular product being provided;
•General and Heavy Construction: General construction annual receipts may not exceed $13.5 to $17 million, depending on the type of construction;
•Special Trade Construction: Annual receipts may not exceed $7 million; and
•Agriculture: Annual receipts may not exceed $0.5 to $9.0 million, depending on the agricultural product.
There are many types of certifications available for Small Businesses.

Minority Owned Businesses (MBE)

A minority-owned business is a for-profit enterprise, regardless of size, physically located in the United States or its trust territories, which is owned, operated and controlled by minority group members. “Minority group members” are United States citizens who are Asian, Black, Hispanic and Native American.

Ownership by minority individuals means the business is at least 51% owned by such individuals or, in the case of a publicly-owned business, at least 51% of the stock is owned by one or more such individuals. Further, the management and daily operations are controlled by those minority group members.

For purposes of NMSDCs (National Minority Supplier Development Council) program, a minority group member is an individual who is a U.S. citizen with at least 1/4 or 25% minimum (documentation to support claim of 25% required from applicant) of the following: •Asian-Indian – A U.S. citizen whose origins are from India, Pakistan and Bangladesh
•Asian-Pacific – A U.S. citizen whose origins are from Japan, China, Indonesia, Malaysia, Taiwan, Korea, Vietnam, Laos, Cambodia, the Philippines, Thailand, Samoa, Guam, the U.S. Trust Territories of the Pacific or the Northern Marianas.
•Black – A U.S. citizen having origins in any of the Black racial groups of Africa.
•Hispanic – A U.S. citizen of true-born Hispanic heritage, from any of the Spanish-speaking areas of the following regions: Mexico, Central America, South America and the Caribbean Basin only. Brazilians shall be listed under Hispanic designation for review and certification purposes.
•Native American – A person who is an American Indian, Eskimo, Aleut or Native Hawaiian, and regarded as such by the community of which the person claims to be a part. Native Americans must be documented members of a North American tribe, band or otherwise organized group of native people who are indigenous to the continental United States and proof can be provided through a Native American Blood Degree Certificate (i.e., tribal registry letter, tribal roll register number).
Certification is done at the local or regional level. The NMSDC and its affiliates do charge a non-refundable application fee. Certification must be renewed each year along with payment of annual fee. To find the certifying agency nearest to your location, click here. Certification application forms can be obtained from these agencies.

Women Owned Businesses (WBE)

To become certified as a woman owned business, businesses must show: •All prospective members must provide clear and documented evidence that at least 51% or more is women-owned, managed, and controlled.
•The business must be open for at least six months.
•The business owner must be a U.S. citizen or legal resident alien.
Evidence must indicate that: •The contribution of capital and/or expertise by the woman business owner is real and substantial and in proportion to the interest owned.
•The woman business owner must direct or cause the direction of management, policy, fiscal, and operational matters.
•The woman business owner shall have the ability to perform in the area of specialty or expertise without reliance on either the finances or resources of a firm that is not owned by a woman.
Certification is done at the local or regional level. The Women’s Business Council does charge a non-refundable application fee. Certification must be renewed each year along with payment of annual fee. To find the certifying agency nearest to your location, click here. Certification application forms can be obtained from these agencies.

Small Disadvantaged Businesses (SDB) or Disadvantaged Business Enterprises (DBE)

Federal law mandates a number of requirements with respect to disadvantaged business enterprises (“DBEs”) – as such entities are defined under federal law – in projects where federal funds are utilized. In terms of public works and construction projects, federal funds are generally used to some extent for major transportation projects in particular.

These requirements, which are under the jurisdiction of the United States Department of Transportation, include setting of DBE utilization goals, design and implementation of a DBE “program”, monitoring and reporting.

To qualify as a DBE, the business must be owned and controlled by one or more socially and economically disadvantaged persons as defined by DBE Regulation 49 CFR Parts 23 and 26. The presumption of disadvantage is refutable. Businesses must show: •Minimum 51% ownership, control, and expertise of the individual(s) and
•Control of the daily management and operations of the individual(s)
The business’ size as measured by average annual gross receipts over the most recent three years must be under the specified dollar amounts. These size standards are set according to the business’ North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code. Depending on the industry, these limits can range from $2.5 million averaged per year to $17.4 million averaged per year. Manufacturers, wholesalers and retailers must meet an employee size standard ranging between 500 to 1500 employees, depending on the NAICS classification, and their average three year gross sales must be less than $17.4 million.

Recently, changes to the DBE regulations require all owner applicants to complete a Statement of Disadvantage and a Personal Financial Statement. All eligible owners must affirm that they are members of a disadvantaged group (for example, an eligible ethnic minority or female). In addition, the personal net worth of each eligible owner applicant must be less than $750,000, excluding the values of the applicant’s ownership interest in the business seeking certification and the owner’s primary residence.

Generally, certification is done at the local or regional level. There is no fee to apply for certification. Certification consultants are available through this site for fee based assistance. Also, see the seminar schedule for upcoming certification assistance workshops.

To find the certifying agency nearest to your location, click here. Certification application forms can be obtained from these agencies.

8(a) Designation

A business enterprise meets the basic requirements for admission to the 8(a) Business Development program if it is a small business which is unconditionally owned and controlled by one or more socially and economically disadvantaged individuals who are of good character and citizens of the United States, and which demonstrates potential for success. This certification is geared more for socially and economically disadvanted individuals as defined in the Small Business Act.

The 8(a) Program offers a broad scope of assistance to socially and economically disadvantaged firms. The SDB certification strictly pertains to benefits in federal procurement. Firms achieving 8(a) certification automatically qualify for SDB certification.

Program participation is divided into two stages: the developmental stage and the transitional stage. The developmental stage is four years and the transitional stage is five years. Participants are reviewed annually for compliance with eligibility requirements.
8(a) General Requirements for Certification: •Must be at least 51% owned and controlled by a socially and economically disadvantaged individual or individuals
•African Americans, Hispanic Americans, Asian Pacific Americans, Subcontinent Asian Americans, and Native Americans are presumed to qualify
•Other individuals can be admitted into the program if they show through a preponderance of the evidence that they are disadvantaged because of race, ethnicity, gender, physical handicap or residence in an environment isolated from the mainstream of American society
•Individuals must have a net worth of less than $250,000, excluding the equity of the business and primary residence
•Must meet applicable size standards for small businesses in their industry
•2 full years of business operations
The Small Business Administration’s Frequently Asked Questions page explains many of the common questions regarding this program. More detailed information can be found in the Code of Federal Regulations regarding Small Business Development.

HUBZone Business Enterprises (HUB)

To participate in HUB (Historically Underutilized Business) contracting programs, a business must be determined to be a “qualified HUBzone small business concern”. A firm can be qualified if: • It is small,
• It is located in an “historically underutilized business zone” (HUB Zone)
• It is owned and controlled by one or more US Citizens, and
• At least 35% of its employees reside in a HUBZone.
To find out if you are in a HUBZone, visit the SBA’s HUBZone page.

Disabled Veteran Businesses (DVBE)

The law defines a disabled veteran as a United States military, naval or air service veteran with a service related disability of at least 10 percent.

For a firm to be certified as a DVBE, it must submit a completed Small Business and/or Disabled Veteran Business Enterprise Certification Application and meet the following legal requirements: •It is a sole proprietorship or partnership at least 51 percent owned by one or more disabled veterans or, in the case of a publicly owned business, with at least 51 percent of its stock owned by one or more disabled veterans; a subsidiary which is wholly owned by a corporation in which at least 51 percent of the parent company’s voting stock is owned by one or more disabled veterans; or a joint venture in which at least 51 percent of the joint venture’s management, control and earnings are held by one or more disabled veterans.
•One or more disabled veterans control the management and daily control of the daily business operations.
•The disabled veteran(s) exercising management and control need not be the same disabled veteran(s) who own the firm.
•It is a sole proprietorship, partnership or corporation with its home office located in the United States and is not a branch or subsidiary of a foreign corporation, firm or business.
Generally, certification is done at the local or regional level. There is no fee to apply for certification. Certification consultants are available through this site for fee based assistance. Also, see the seminar schedule for upcoming certification assistance workshops.

To find the certifying agency nearest to your location, click here. Certification application forms can be obtained from these agencies.

Hispanic Small Business Recognition Lunch

The Hispanic Chamber of Commerce of Montgomery County, honored Three Small Business on Friday June 27, 2014, in recognition of their support and commitment to the small business community and the Chamber over the past year.  Since September 2013, we have organized nine small business seminars, forums and many networking mixers with their support.

AWARDEES FOR 2014:

ANA G MENDEZ UNIVERSITY SYSTEM

EUREKAFACTS LLC

VEGA PAGES

RSVP by Wednesday at 5PM to (240) 630 8639

Keynote Speaker

Author and Business Consultant Kenneth Weiss

FREE TRADE AGREEMENT

TRATADO DE LIBRE COMERCIO

and its impact on Imports and Exports

Case studies will be presented

 

 

 

Awards & Free Trade Agreement Flyer

Montgomery County DED: one of the Sponsors of our Seminars

 

With Montgomery County’s large and growing business community, opportunities for business networking and partnering abound.

 

Local business and civic organizations play a vital role in organizing business initiatives and community activities in the county. The following pages list chambers of commerce, women’s business organizations, and other groups that work closely with the Department of Economic Development to provide a variety of services and business development opportunities.

 

If you are looking for networking events, expos, seminars, or other scheduled events, go to our Calendar of Events for one stop business opportunities to help your company grow.

 

Local Economic Development Organizations

 

Business Membership Organizations

 

Business Resource Organizations